The PokerNews Quiz: Coin Flips That Aren’t Really Coin Flips


The term “coin flip” (or just “flip”) is often used loosely in poker.

It can be used to describe genuinely “50-50” spots — say {K-Hearts} vs. {K-Spades}{K-Diamonds} in a preflop all-in in hold’em, a “true” coin flip situation. Or {A-Diamonds}{10-Diamonds} vs. {3-Clubs}{3-Diamonds}, virtually a coin flip (with the pocket treys having about 50.01 percent equity).

More often it is used to describe situations in which each player’s chance is roughly similar, though not technically even. Ace-king versus pocket queens is a good example — often called a “flip,” even if the queens might have a significant edge. For example, {Q-Diamonds}{Q-Hearts} is about a 57 percent favorite against {A-Spades}{K-Clubs}.

You’ll also hear players talk about “flipping” with reference to going all in without looking at their cards. There’s likely going to be a difference in hand strength once the cards are turned over, but before that happens both players are playing random hands and thus essentially have the same chance at winning.

Below find eight “coin flip” hands that are close though not really coin flips. With each choose the hand you believe to have the best chance to win.

Get six of eight right and you pass the quiz, and when done check out the “Top results” to see how you did versus others. If logged in here at PokerNews, your username will appear. Need an account? Click here to get one.

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